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The University of Georgia's So Easy to Preserve Canning Guide -- Pickled Products

These documents are not the most updated version approved by the USDA for consumers to use at home.  See the North Carolina State Univ. link in Recipes.

Pickled products truly add spice to meals and snacks. The skillful blending of spices, sugar and vinegar with fruits and vegetables creates a crisp, firm texture and a pungent, sweet-sour flavor.

Although food markets today offer a wide variety of pickles and relishes, many homemakers like to make their own pickled products when garden vegetables and fresh fruits are in abundant supply.

Various types of pickled products can be made depending on the ingredients used and methods of preparation. There are four general classes:

Brined pickles or fermented pickles go through a curing process in a brine (salt and water) solution for one or more weeks. Curing changes the color, flavor, and texture of the product. If the product is a fermented one, the lactic acid produced during fermentation helps preserve the product. In brined products that are cured but not fermented, acid in the form of vinegar is added later to preserve the food.

Fresh pack or quick process pickles are covered with boiling hot vinegar, spices, and seasonings. Sometimes, the product may be brined for several hours and then drained, before being covered with the pickling liquid. These pickles are easy to prepare and have a tart flavor. Fresh pack or quick pickles have a better flavor if allowed to stand for several weeks after they are sealed in jars.

Fruit pickles are prepared from whole or sliced fruits and simmered in a spicy, sweet-sour syrup made with vinegar or lemon juice.

Relishes are made from chopped fruits and vegetables cooked to desired consistency in a spicy vinegar solution.

The level of acidity in a pickled product is as important to its safety as it is to its taste and texture. Never alter the proportions of vinegar, food or water in a recipe. Use only tested recipes. By doing so, you can help prevent the growth of clostridium botulinum.

 

Pickled Product Basics -- Ingredients

Produce

Select tender vegetables and firm fruit. Pears and peaches may be slightly underripe for pickling. See Table 2  for the approximate yields of canned food from fresh.

Always use a pickling variety of cucumber. Do not expect good quality pickles if you use "table" or "slicing" cucumbers. Seed catalogs are a good source of information about cucumber varieties suitable for pickling. If you buy cucumbers, select unwaxed ones for pickling whole, because the brine or pickling solutions can't penetrate the wax. Use 1½-inch cucumbers for gherkins; 4-inch for dills. Odd-shaped and more mature cucumbers should be used for relishes and bread-and-butter style pickles.

For highest quality, plan to pickle the fruits or vegetables within 24 hours after they are picked. If the produce cannot be used immediately, refrigerate it, or spread it where it will be well ventilated and cool. This is particularly important for cucumbers because they deteriorate rapidly, especially at room temperature.

Just before pickling, sort the fruits and vegetables and select the size best suited for the specific recipe. Wash well, especially around the stems. Soil trapped here can be a source of bacteria responsible for softening of pickles. Be sure to remove a 1/16 inch slice from the blossom end of the vegetables. The blossoms contain enzymes that can also softening.

Do not use fruits or vegetables that show even slight evidence of mold. Proper processing kills potential spoilage organisms but does not destroy the off-flavor that may have already been produced by mold growth on the fruits or vegetables.

Salt

Pure granulated salt, such as "pickling" or "canning" salt, should be used. It can be purchased from the grocery, hardware or farm supply stores. Other salts contain anti-caking materials that may make the brine cloudy.

Do not alter salt concentrations in fermented pickles or sauerkraut. Proper fermentation depends on correct proportions of salt and other ingredients.

Vinegar

Use cider or white vinegar of 5-percent acidity (50 grain). This is the range of acidity for most commercially bottled vinegars. Cider vinegar has a good flavor and aroma, but may darken white or light-colored fruits and vegetables. White distilled vinegar is often used for onions, cauliflower and pears where clearness of color is desired.

Do not use homemade vinegar or vinegar of unknown acidity in pickling. Do not dilute the vinegar unless the recipe specifies, because you will be diluting the preservative effect. If a less sour product is preferred, add sugar rather than decrease the vinegar.

Sugar

Use white sugar unless the recipe calls for brown. White sugar gives a product of lighter color, but brown sugar may be preferred for flavor. If you plan to use a sugar substitute, follow recipes developed for these products. These are not usually recommended, as heat and/or storage may alter their flavor. Also, sugar helps to plump the pickles and keep them firm.

Spices

Use fresh whole spices for the best quality and flavor in pickles. Powdered spices may cause the product to darken and become cloudy. Pickles will darken less if you tie whole spices loosely in a clean white cloth or cheesecloth bag and then remove the bag from the product before packing the jars.

Spices deteriorate and quickly lose their pungency in heat and humidity. Therefore, store any unused spices in an air-tight container in a cool place.

Water

When brining pickles, hard water may interfere with the formation of acid and prevent pickles from curing properly. If soft water is unavailable, hard water can be softened. Simply boil it 15 minutes and let set for 24 hours, covered. Remove any scum that appears. Slowly pour the water from the container so the sediment will not be disturbed. Discard the sediment. The water is now ready for use. Distilled water can also be used in pickle making although it is relatively expensive.

Firming Agents

If good quality ingredients are used in pickling and up-to-date methods are followed, lime and alum are not needed for crisp pickles.

If you choose to use firming agents, alum may be safely used to firm fermented cucumbers. However, since it's unnecessary, it is not included in the recipes in this book. The calcium in lime does improve pickle firmness. Food-grade lime may be used as a lime-water solution for soaking fresh cucumbers 12 to 24 hours before pickling them. However, EXCESS LIME ABSORBED BY THE CUCUMBERS MUST BE REMOVED TO MAKE SAFE PICKLES. To remove excess lime, drain the lime-water solution, rinse and then re-soak the cucumbers in fresh water for 1 hour. Repeat the rinsing and soaking steps two more times.

Equipment

The right equipment prevents pickle failure and saves time and energy. Read each recipe completely to make sure you have the right equipment, before you start to make pickled products.

Containers and Weights for Fermentation

Pickles and sauerkraut can be fermented in large stoneware crocks, large glass jars or food-grade plastic containers. If you're not sure whether a plastic container is safe for food, read its label or contact its manufacturer. Another option is to line the questionable container with several thicknesses of food-grade plastic bags. Do not use aluminum, copper, brass, galvanized or iron containers for fermenting pickles or sauerkraut.

The container needs to be large enough to allow several inches of space between the top of the food and the top of the container. Usually a 1-gallon container is needed for each 5 pounds of fresh vegetables. Sauerkraut may be fermented in quart or half-gallon canning jars, but there is a greater chance of spoilage.

After the vegetables are placed in the container and covered with brine, they must be completely submerged in the brine. A heavy plate or glass lid that fits down inside the container can be used. If extra weight is needed, a glass jar(s) filled with water and sealed can be set on top of the plate or lid. The vegetables should be covered by 1 to 2 inches of brine.

Another option for submerging the vegetables in brine is to place one food-grade plastic bag inside another and fill the inside bag with some of the pickling brine. Freezer bags sold for packaging turkeys are the right size for 5-gallon containers. Close the end securely. Then use this filled bag as the weight on top of the vegetables. Filling the bag with brine is a precaution, in case the bags are accidentally punctured.

Equipment for Fresh Pack Pickles

Pickling liquids should be heated in a stainless steel, aluminum, glass or unchipped enamelware saucepan. Do not use copper, brass, galvanized or iron utensils. These metals can react with acids or salts and cause undesirable color changes in the pickles.

For short-term brining or soaking, use crocks, saucepans or bowls made from stoneware, glass, stainless steel, aluminum or unchipped enamelware. Except for aluminum, the same containers can be used for soaking vegetables in lime. Lime pits aluminum containers, and cause and increased level of aluminum in the pickles.

Processing Equipment

Small utensils that can add ease and convenience to home pickling include measuring spoons, measuring cups, sharp knives, large trays, tongs, a vegetable peeler, a ladle with lip for pouring, slotted spoons, a footed colander or wire basket, a large-mouthed funnel, a food chopper or grinder, a cutting board and large wood, plastic or stainless steel spoons.

Household Scales

Household scales will be needed if the recipes specify ingredients by weight. They are necessary in making sauerkraut to insure correct proportions of salt and shredded cabbage.

Processing

Pickles and relishes are high acid products. This acid may come from the large amount of vinegar added to them. Or, in brined or fermented pickles, the acid is produced naturally during the fermentation process by lactic acid bacteria. Because they are high acid foods, they are processed in a boiling water bath canner.

Processing is necessary for all pickles and relishes to destroy the yeasts, molds and bacteria that may cause the products to spoil and also to inactivate enzymes that could affect the color, flavor and texture of the pickled product. As in all canning, a seal is necessary on the jar to prevent other microorganisms from entering.

For all Pickled Products

Carefully place the filled jars onto a rack in the canner containing hot water. The water should be deep enough to cover the jars by at least 1 inch. Cover the canner and bring the water to a boil. Start counting processing time as soon as the water begins to boil. Process for the length of time specified in the recipe, keeping the water boiling. If no time is given, process the product for at least 10 minutes.

Optional Processing for Cucumber Pickles

Sometimes processing cucumber pickles in simmering water (180°) for 30 minutes results in crisper products. To do so, pack the room temperature product in the jar and pour 165° to 180° F liquid over the product, leaving the appropriate head space. Remove air bubbles, wipe jar rims, adjust lids, and process at 180° F for 30 minutes. Be sure to use a thermometer. This temperature is hard to determine without one and spoilage could be the result. CAUTION: Do not use this treatment on reduced-sodium pickles.

Caution! Attitude Adjustments

The processing times given for pickle products are for altitudes of 0 to 1000 feet. If you are processing pickles at an altitude over 1000 feet, see the below for the correct processing times.

On Guard Against Spoilage

Always be on the alert for signs of spoilage. Before opening a jar examine it closely. A bulging lid or leakage may mean the contents are spoiled.

When a jar is opened, look for other signs of spoilage, such as spurting liquid, disagreeable odor, change in color or unusual softness, mushiness or slipperiness of the product. If there is even the slightest indication of spoilage, do not taste the contents. Dispose the food so it cannot be eaten by humans or animals.

Cucumber Pickle Recipes

Fermented Dill Pickles

Use the following quantities for each gallon capacity of your container:
4 pounds of 4-inch pickling cucumbers
2 tablespoons dill seed or 4 to 5 heads fresh dill
2 cloves garlic (optional)
2 dried red peppers (optional)
2 teaspoons whole mixed
pickling spices (optional)
½ cup salt
¼ cup vinegar
8 cups water

Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch slice off bottom end and discard. Leave ¼-inch of stem attached. Place half of dill and spices on bottom of a clean, suitable container. Add cucumbers, remaining dill and one or more of the optional spices. Dissolve salt in vinegar and water. Pour over cucumbers. Add suitable weight.

Store where temperature is between 70° F and 75° F for about 3 to 4 weeks while fermenting. Temperatures of 55° F to 65° F are acceptable, but the fermentation will take 5 to 6 weeks. Avoid temperature above 80° F, because pickles will become soft.

Fermenting pickles cure slowly. Check the container several times a week and promptly remove surface scum or mold. CAUTION: If the pickles become soft, slimy or develop a disagreeable odor, discard them.

Fully fermented pickles may be stored in the original container for about 4 to 6 months, provided they are refrigerated and surface scum and molds are removed regularly. Canning fully fermented pickles is a better way to store them.

To process fermented dill pickles, pour the brine into a pan. Heat slowly to a boil and simmer 5 minutes. Filter brine through paper coffee filters to reduce cloudiness, if desired. Fill hot jars with pickles, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jars to ½ inch from top with hot brine. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes for pints; 15 minutes for quarts in a boiling water bath.

Quick Fresh Pack Dill Pickles
(about 7 to 9 pints)

8 pounds of 3- to 5- inch pickling cucumbers
2 gallons water
1¼ cups canning salt (divided)
1½ quarts vinegar
¼ cup sugar
2 quarts water
2 tablespoons whole mixed pickling spice
about 3 tablespoons whole mustard seed
about 14 heads of fresh dill or 5 tablespoons dill seed

 

 

Wash cucumbers Cut 1/16-inch slice off blossom end and discard. Leave ¼-inch of stem attached. Dissolve ¾ cup salt in 2 gallons of water. Pour over cucumbers and let stand for 12 hours. Drain. Combine vinegar, ½ cup salt, sugar and 2 quarts water. Add mixed pickling spices tied in a clean white cloth. Heat to boiling.

Fill jars with pickles. Add 1 teaspoon mustard seed and 1½ heads fresh dill (or 1½ teaspoons dill seed) per pint jar. Cover with boiling pickling solution, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes for pints, 15 minutes for quarts, in a boiling water bath.

Refrigerator Dills
(about 4 or 5 quart jars)

6 pounds of 3- to 4- inch pickling cucumbers
10 to 24 large heads of fresh dill weed or ¾ cup dill seeds
1½ gallons water
¾ cup canning salt
2 to 3 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
6 tablespoons mixed pickling spice

 

Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch slice from blossom end and discard. Leave ¼- inch of stem attached. Place cucumbers in a suitable 3-gallon container.. Add dill. Combine water, salt, garlic and pickling spices. Bring to a boil. Cool and pour over cucumbers in a container. Add a suitable weight. Keep at room temperature for 1 week. Then fill jars with pickles and brine. Seal and store in refrigerator. Pickles may be eaten after 3 days and should be consumed within 2 months.

Kosher Dills
(6 or 7 pints)

 

30 to 36 cucumbers (3 to 4 inches long)
3 cups vinegar
3 cups water
6 tablespoons salt
Fresh or dried dill
Garlic
Mustard Seed

 

Wash the cucumbers. Slice 1/16-inch from blossom end and discard. Leave ¼-inch of stem attached. Make a brine of the vinegar, water and salt. Bring to a boil. Place a generous layer of dill, ½ to 1 clove of garlic(sliced) and ½ teaspoon of mustard seed in bottom of each pint jar. Pack the cucumbers into the hot jars. When the jars are half-filled with cucumbers add more dill and complete the packing of the jars. Fill the jars ½ inch from top with the boiling brine. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath. Pickles will shrivel after processing. They will later plump in sealed jar.

Bread-and-Butter Pickle Slices
(about 8 pint jars)

6 pounds of 4- to 5-inch pickling cucumbers
8 cups thinly sliced onions (about 3 pounds)
½ cup salt
Crushed or cubed ice
4 cups vinegar
4 ½ cups sugar
2 tablespoons mustard seed
1½ celery seed
1 tablespoon ground tumeric
1 cup pickling lime (optional- follow directionsbelow for firmer pickles)

 

Preparation - Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch off blossom end and discard. Cut into 3/16-inch rings. Combine cucumbers and onions in a large bowl. Add salt. Cover with 2 inches crushed or cubed ice. Refrigerate 3 to 4 hours, adding more ice as needed.

Preparation Variation for Firmer Pickles - Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch off blossom end and discard. Cut into 3/16-inch slices. Mix 1 cup pickling lime, ½ cup salt and 1 gallon water in a 2- to 3-gallon crock, glass or enamelware container. CAUTION: Avoid inhaling lime dust while mixing the lime-water solution.

Soak cucumber slices in lime water for 12 to 24 hours, stirring occasionally. Remove from lime solution, rinse and resoak one hour in fresh cold water. Repeat the rinsing and soaking steps two more times. Handle carefully, as slices will be brittle.

To Make Pickles - Add sugar and remaining ingredients to vinegar in a large pot. Boil 10 minutes. Add well drained cucumbers and onions and slowly reheat to boiling. Fill pint or quart jars with slices, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill to ½ inch from top with hot cooking liquid. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process pints or quarts for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

After processing and cooling, jars should be stored 4 to 5 weeks to develop ideal flavor.

Quick Sour Pickles
(about 8 pint jars)

 

About 25 cucumbers, medium-sized
½ gallon cider vinegar
2 cups water
½ cup salt
½ cup sugar
½ cup mustard seed

 

Wash cucumbers. Remove 1/16-inch slice from blossom ends and discard. Slice cucumbers lengthwise. Pack into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Mix vinegar, water, salt, sugar and mustard seed and bring to a boil. Fill jar to ½ inch from top with boiling hot liquid. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Ice Water Pickles
(about 6 quart jars)

 

6 pounds medium cucumbers
3 quarts white vinegar
Ice
36 tiny pickling onions
1 cup salt
3 cups sugar
6 2-inch pieces of celery
2 tablespoons mustard seed

 

Wash cucumbers. Slice 1/16-inch off blossom ends and discard. Cut each cucumber into 4 to 8 spears (according to size of the cucumbers). Soak in ice water 3 hours then drain and pack into hot, canning jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Add 6 tiny pickling onions, 1 piece celery and 1 teaspoon mustard seed to each quart jar. Just before filling canning jars, heat vinegar, salt and sugar to a boil. Fill jars to ½ inch from the top with hot liquid. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Sweet Cucumber Pickles
(about 4 or 5 pint jars)

 

3 pounds cucumbers, medium-sized
1 quart vinegar
2 teaspoons salt
5 cups sugar

 

Wash cucumbers. Slice 1/16-inch off blossom ends and discard. Pour boiling water over the cucumbers and let stand 5 to 10 minutes. Drain off the hot water and pour cold water over the cucumbers. Use running water or change water until cucumbers are cooled. Mix vinegar, salt and sugar. Bring to boil; drop cucumbers into the boiling liquid. Return to a boil. Pack hot pickles into hot canning jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jar to ½ inch from top with boiling liquid. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Sweet Gherkins
(about 6 to 7 pint jars)

 

5 quarts (about 7 pounds) 1½-inch cucumbers
½ cup pure granulated salt
8 cups sugar
1½ quarts vinegar
¾ teaspoon turmeric
2 teaspoons celery seed
2 teaspoons whole mixed pickling spice
2 cinnamon sticks
½ teaspoon fennel (optional)
2 teaspoons vanilla (optional)

First day

Morning - Wash cucumbers thoroughly; scrub with vegetable brush. Cut 1/16-slice off blossom ends and discard. Leave ¼-inch of stem. Drain cucumbers; place in large suitable container  and cover with boiling water.

Afternoon (6 to 8 hours later)-Drain; add ¼ cup salt and cover with fresh boiling water.

Second day

Afternoon-Drain; add ¼ cup salt; cover with fresh, boiling water.

Third day

Morning-Drain; prick cucumbers in several places with table fork. Make syrup of 3 cups of the sugar and 3 cups of the vinegar; add turmeric and spices. Heat to boiling and pour over the cucumbers. (Cucumbers will be partially covered at this point.)

Afternoon (6 to 8 hours later)-Drain syrup into pan; add 2 cups of the sugar and 2 cups of the vinegar to the syrup. Heat to boiling and pour over pickles.

Fourth Day

Morning-Drain syrup into pan; add 2 cups of the sugar and 1 cup of vinegar to syrup. Heat to boiling and pour over pickles.

Afternoon (6 to 8 hours later)-Drain syrup into pan; add remaining 1 cup sugar and the vanilla to syrup; heat to boiling. Pack pickles into hot pint jars and cover with boiling syrup to ½-inch from top of jar. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust jar lids. Process for 5 minutes in boiling water bath.

Sweet Pickle Rings
(about 5 to 6 pint jars)

 

4 pounds (almost 3 quarts) 3- to 4-inch cucumbers
1 quart vinegar
½ cup sugar
3 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon mustard seed
4 cups sugar
3 cups white vinegar
1 tablespoon whole allspice
1 tablespoon celery seed
3 cinnamon sticks

 

Wash cucumbers. Slice 1/8 inch from each end and discard. Slice into ¼-inch thick rings. Mix 1 quart vinegar, ½ cup sugar, salt, mustard seed and cinnamon in a large pan. Simmer 5-7 minutes or until cucumbers change to dullgreen. Cucumbers should not get soft. Meanwhile, combine 3 cups white vinegar, 4 cups sugar, whole allspice and celery seed in another pan and heat just to boiling. Drain cucumbers and discard liquid. Pack hot slices into hot canning jars. Fill to ½ inch from top with hot liquid. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Quick Sweet Pickle Slices or Strips
(about 8 pint jars)

 

8 pounds of 3- to 4-inch pickling cucumbers
1/3 cup salt
Crushed or cubed ice
4 ½ cups sugar
3½ cups vinegar
2 teaspoons celery seed
1 tablespoon whole allspice
2 tablespoons mustard seed
1 cup pickling lime (optional- follow
directions below for firmer pickles)

 

Preparation Without lime-Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch off blossom end and discard. Cut cucumbers into slices or strips. Place in a bowl and sprinkle with 1/3 cup salt. Cover with 2 inches of crushed or cubed ice. Refrigerate 3 to 4 hours. Add more ice as needed.

Preparation With Lime for Firmer Pickles-Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch off blossom end and discard. Cut cucumbers into slices or strips. Mix 1 cup pickling lime, ½ cup salt and 1 gallon of water in a 2- to 3-gallon crock, glass or enamelware container. CAUTION: Avoid inhaling lime dust while mixing the lime-water solution.

Soak cucumber slices or strips in the lime water solution for 12 to 24 hours, stirring occasionally. Remove from lime solution, rinse and resoak one hour in fresh cold water. Repeat the rinsing and resoaking two more times. Handle carefully because slices or strips will be brittle.

To Make Pickles-Combine sugar, vinegar, celery seed, allspice and mustard seed in 6-quart saucepot. Heat to boiling.

Hot Pack-Sterilize canning jars

Add drained cucumbers to hot pickling syrup and heat until just hot. Pack cucumbers into sterile jars leaving ½-inch headspace. Fill jars to ½-inch from top with hot pickling syrup. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process pints or quarts for 5 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Raw Pack-Pack cucumbers into jars leaving ½-inch headspace. Fill jars to ½-inch from top with hot pickling syrup. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes for pints, 15 for quarts.

After processing and cooling hot pack or raw pack pickles, store jars for 4 to 5 weeks to allow pickles to develop ideal flavor.

Variation-Two slices of raw onion can be added to each jar before filling, if desired.

14-day Sweet Pickles
(about 5 to 9 pint jars)

 

4 pounds of 2- to 5-inch pickling cucumbers
(for packing whole, use uniform size)
¾ cup canning salt
2 tablespoons mixed pickling spice
2 tablespoons celery seed
5½ cups sugar
4 cups vinegar

 

Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch slice off bottom end and discard. Leave ¼ inch of stem attached. Place whole cucumbers in suitable 1-gallon container. Add ¼ cup salt to 2 quarts water and bring to a boil. Pour over cucumbers. Add suitable weight. Place clean towel over container and keep the temperature at about 70° F.

On the Third and Fifth Days-Drain salt water and discard. Rinse cucumbers. If any scum has formed, remove it and scald the weight. Return cucumbers to container. Add ¼ cup salt to 2 quarts fresh water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil. Pour over cucumbers. Replace cover and weight. Re-cover with clean towel.

On the Seventh Day-Drain salt water and discard. Rinse cucumbers and scald container and weight. Cut cucumbers into slices or strips, if desired. Return whole or sliced cucumbers to container. Place celery seed and pickling spices in small cheesecloth bag. Combine 2 cups sugar and 4 cups vinegar in a saucepan. Add spice bag and bring to a boil. Pour pickling solution over cucumbers. Place spice bag in container. Add cover and weight. Re-cover with a clean towel.

On Each of the Next Six days--Drain syrup into a saucepan. Remove spice bag and place in syrup. Add ½ cup sugar to syrup and bring to a boil. Remove cucumbers and rinse. Scald container, cover and weight. Return cucumbers to container, add boiled syrup, spice bag and weight. Re-cover with towel.

On the Fourteenth Day-Sterilize canning jars, if processing in pints. Remove and discard spice bag. Drain syrup into a saucepan. Add ½ cup sugar to syrup and bring to boil. Pack pickles into hot pint or quart jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jars to ½-inch from top with hot liquid. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 5 minutes for pints; 10 minutes for quarts in a boiling water bath.

 

Vegetable Pickle Recipes

Artichoke Pickles
(about 10 or 12 pint jars)

 

1 peck Jerusalem artichokes
Vinegar
2 cups salt
4 tablespoons tumeric
10 to 12 medium red peppers
Pickling Solution:
1 gallon vinegar
13 cups (6 pounds) sugar
2 tablespoons turmeric
½ cup pickling spice (tied in spice bag)

 

Scrub Jerusalem artichokes and cut into chunks. Pack in a food-grade plastic container, crock or glass jar. Cover with vinegar. Add 2 cups salt and 4 tablespoons of turmeric, mix. Soak 24 hours.

Just before that time is up, combine 1 gallon vinegar, sugar, pickling spice and 2 tablespoons turmeric, in a large pan. Simmer for 20 to 25 minutes. Remove spice bag.

Drain artichokes, discarding the liquid. Pack artichokes into hot pint jars, adding 1 medium red pepper to each jar. Be sure to leave ½-inch head space.

Fill to ½ inch from the top with hot pickling solution. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust jar lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Pickled Green Beans
(4 pint jars)

 

2 pounds green beans
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
4 heads dill or 4 teaspoons dill seed
4 cloves garlic
2 ½ cups water
2 ½ cups vinegar
¼ cup salt

Sterilize canning jars. Wash, trim ends and cut beans into 4-inch pieces.

Pack beans, lengthwise, into hot pint jars, leaving ½-inch head space. To each pint, add ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper, 1 clove garlic, and 1dill head or 1 teaspoon dill seed. Combine remaining ingredients and bring to boil. Pour, boiling hot liquid over beans, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 5 minutes in boiling water bath. Let beans stand for at least 2 weeks before tasting to allow the flavor to develop.

Pickled Three Bean Salad
(about 5 to 6 half-pint jars)

 

1½ cups cut and blanched green or yellow beans
(see directions below)

1½ cups canned, drained, red kidney beans
1 cup canned, drained garbanzo beans
½ cup peeled and thinly sliced onion

½ cup trimmed and thinly sliced celery
½ cup sliced green peppers
½ cup white vinegar
¼ cup bottled lemon juice
¾ cup sugar
1¼ cups water
¼ cup oil
½ teaspoon salt

Wash and remove ends of fresh beans. Cut or snap into 1- or 2-inch pieces. Blanch 3 minutes and cool immediately. Rinse kidney beans with tap water and drain again. Combine vinegar, lemon juice, sugar and water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Add oil and salt. Mix well. Add beans, onions, celery and green pepper to pickling solution and bring to a simmer. Remove from heat, marinate 12 to 24 hours in refrigerator, then heat entire mixture to a boil. Fill hot jars with solids to ½ inch from top. Add hot liquid, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Process half-pints or pints for 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Pickled Beets
(about 8 pint jars)

 

7 pounds of 2- to 2 ½-inch diameter beets
4 cups vinegar
1½ teaspoons salt
2 cups sugar
2 cups water
2 cinnamon sticks
12 whole cloves
4 to 6 onions (2- to 2½-inch diameter) (optional)

 

Trim off beet tops, leaving 1 inch of stem and roots to prevent bleeding of color. Wash thoroughly. Sort for size. Cover similar sizes with boiling water and cook until tender (about 25 to 30 minutes). CAUTION: Drain and discard liquid.

Cool beets. Trim off roots and stems; slip off skins. Slice into ¼-inch slices. Peel and thinly slice onions. Combine vinegar, salt, sugar and fresh water. Put spices in cheesecloth bag and add to vinegar mixture. Bring to a boil. Add beets and onions. Simmer 5 minutes. Remove spice bag. Fill jars with beets and onions, leaving ½-inch head space. Add hot vinegar solution, allowing ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process pints or quarts 30 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Variation-For pickled whole baby beets, follow above directions but use beets that are 1- to 1½-inches in diameter. Pack whole; do not slice. Onions may be omitted.

Kosher Style Dill Green Tomato Pickles
(6 quart jars)

 

Small green firm tomatoes
6 stalks celery, cut in 2-inch lengths
6 sweet green peppers, quartered
6 cloves garlic
2 quarts water
1 quart distilled white vinegar
1 cup salt
Fresh dill to taste

 

Wash and drain vegetables. Pack tomatoes in hot jars. Add to each quart jar, 1 clove of garlic, 1 stalk of celery and 1 green pepper cut in fourths. Combine water, vinegar and salt. Boil with the dill for 5 minutes. Pour the hot brine over the pickles in jar, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath. These will be ready for use in 4 to 6 weeks.

Spiced Green Tomatoes
(about 4 pint jars)

 

6 pounds small whole green tomatoes
9 cups sugar
1 pint cider vinegar
2 sticks cinnamon
1 tablespoon whole cloves
1 tablespoon whole allspice
1 tablespoon whole mace
or ½ tablespoon ground mace

 

Small green fig or plum tomatoes are suitable for this pickle. Wash, scald and peel. Make a syrup of the sugar, vinegar and spices. Drop in the whole tomatoes and boil until they become clear.

Pack tomatoes into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Strain syrup and cover tomatoes, again leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Mixed Vegetable Pickles
(about 6 pint jars)

 

1 quart small cucumbers (cut into 1-inch slices)
2 cups pared carrots (1½-inch slices)
2 cups celery (1½- inch slices)
2 sweet red peppers (cut into wide strips)
1 small cauliflower (broken into flowerets)
2 cups peeled pickling onions
1 cup salt
4 quarts water
2 cups sugar
¼ cup mustard seed
2 tablespoons celery seed
1 hot red pepper
6½ cups vinegar

 

Dissolve salt in cold water. Pour over prepared vegetables. Let stand 12 to 18 hours in the refrigerator. Drain thoroughly. Add spices, hot red pepper and sugar to vinegar; boil 3 minutes. Add vegetables; simmer until thoroughly heated.

Pack, boiling hot, into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Marinated Whole Mushrooms
(about 9 half-pint jars)

 

7 pounds small whole mushrooms
½ cup bottled lemon juice
2 cups olive or salad oil
2½ cups white vinegar
1 tablespoon oregano leaves
1 tablespoon dried basil
1 tablespoon salt
½ cup finely chopped onions
¼ cup diced pimiento
2 cloves garlic, cut in quarters
25 black pepper corns

Select very fresh unopened mushrooms with caps less than 1¼ inches in diameter. Wash. Cut stems, leaving ¼ inch attached to cap. Add lemon juice and water to cover. Bring to a boil. Simmer 5 minutes. Drain mushrooms. Mix olive oil, vinegar, oregano, basil and salt in saucepan. Stir in onions and pimiento. Heat to boiling. Place ¼ garlic clove and 2 or 3 peppercorns in each half-pint jar. Fill jars with mushrooms and hot, well-mixed oil/vinegar solution, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process half-pints for 20 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Okra Dill Pickles
(about 8 or 9 pint jars)

 

7 pounds small okra pods
8 or 9 garlic cloves
2/3 cup canning salt
4 teaspoons dill seed
6 small hot peppers
6 cups water
6 cups vinegar

 

Wash and trim okra. Fill hot pint jars firmly with whole okra, leaving ½-inch head space. Place 1 garlic clove in each jar. Combine salt, dill seed, hot peppers, water and vinegar in large saucepan and bring to a boil. Pour hot pickling solution over okra, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process pints for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Pickled Onions
(about 7 pint jars)

 

4 quarts tiny onions, peeled
1 cup salt
2 cups sugar
¼ cup mustard seed
2½ tablespoons prepared horseradish
2 quarts distilled white vinegar
7 small hot red peppers
7 bay leaves

 

To peel onions, cover with boiling water; let stand 2 minutes. Drain; dip in cold water; peel. Sprinkle onions with salt; add cold water to cover. Let stand 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Drain onions; rinse and drain thoroughly. Combine sugar, mustard seed, horseradish and vinegar; simmer 15 minutes.

Pack onions into hot pint jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Add 1 hot pepper and 1 bay leaf to each jar. Heat pickling liquid to a boil. Pour, boiling hot liquid over onions, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in boiling water bath.

Marinated Peppers (Bell, Hungarian, Banana, Jalapeno)
(about 9 half-pint jars)

 

4 pounds firm peppers
1 cup bottled lemon juice
2 cups white vinegar
1 tablespoon oregano leaves
1 cup olive oil or salad oil
½ cup chopped onions
2 tablespoons prepared horseradish (optional)
2 to 3 cloves garlic, quartered (optional)

 

Select your favorite pepper. Wash. Small peppers may be left whole; large ones, quartered. Slash 2 to 4 slits in each pepper. Peel chile or other tough-skinned peppers according to the directions in "Mexican Tomato Sauce." Blanch other peppers for 3 minutes in boiling water. Flatten whole peppers.

Mix lemon juice, vinegar, oregano, oil, onions and horseradish in a saucepan and heat to boiling. Place ¼ garlic clove in each jar. If desired, add ¼ teaspoon salt to each half-pint jar; ½ teaspoon in each pint. Fill jars with peppers to ½ inch from the top. Pour hot, well-mixed oil/pickling solution over peppers, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process half-pints or pints for 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Variation-It is possible to adjust the intensity of pickled jalapeno peppers by using all hot jalapeno peppers(hot style) or blending the jalapeno peppers with sweet and mild peppers(medium or mild style).

For hot style-Use 4 pounds jalapeno peppers.

For medium style-Use 2 pounds jalapeno peppers and 2 pounds sweet and mild peppers.

For mild style-Use 1 pound jalapeno peppers and 3 pounds sweet and mild peppers.

Pickled Peppers (Hungarian, Banana, Other Varieties)
(about 8 pint jars)

 

4 quarts long red, green or yellow peppers
1½ cups salt
2 tablespoons prepared horseradish
2 cloves garlic
10 cups vinegar
2 cups water
¼ cup sugar

 

Wash and drain peppers. Cut 2 small slits in each pepper. Dissolve salt in 1 gallon water. Pour over peppers and let stand 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Drain peppers; rinse again and drain thoroughly. Combine remaining ingredients; simmer 15 minutes. Remove garlic.

Pack peppers into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Bring liquid to a boil. Fill jar ½ inch from top with boiling liquid. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Pickled Jalapeno Peppers
(1 pint jar)

 

Jalapeno peppers (about 1pound)
1 cup vinegar
¼ cup water
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon mixed pickling spices

 

CAUTION: Always wear gloves or coat hands with fat when working with hot peppers. They can cause burns.

Wash peppers and pack tightly into hot jar, leaving ½-inch head space. Combine vinegar, water, salt, and pickling spice; heat to boiling. Pour boiling hot liquid over peppers to ½ inch from jar top. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Sauerkraut
(about 9 quart jars)

 

25 pounds cabbage ¾ cup canning salt

 

For the best sauerkraut, use firm heads of fresh cabbage. Shred cabbage and sauerkraut between 24 and 48 hours after harvest.

Work with about 5 pounds of cabbage at a time. Discard outer leaves. Rinse cabbage heads under cold running water and drain. Cut heads in quarters and remove cores. Shred or slice to a thickness of a 25-cent coin. Put cabbage in a suitable fermentation container.. Add 3 tablespoons of salt. Mix thoroughly, using clean hands. Pack firmly until the salt draws juice from cabbage.

Repeat shredding, salting and packing until all cabbage is in the container. Be sure the container is deep enough so that its rim is at least 4 or 5 inches above the cabbage. If juice does not cover cabbage, add boiled and cooled brine (1½ tablespoons of salt per quart of water).  Weight down the cabbage. Cover container with a clean bath towel.

Store at 70° F to 75° F, kraut will be fully fermented in about 3 to 4 weeks; at 60° F to 65° F, fermentation may take 5 to 6 weeks. At temperatures lower than 60° F, kraut may not ferment. Above 75° F, kraut may become soft. If you weight the cabbage down with a brine-filled bag, do not disturb the crock until normal fermentation is completed (when bubbling ceases). If you use jars as weight, you will have to check the kraut 2 to 3 times each week and remove scum if it forms. Fully fermented kraut may be tightly covered in the refrigerator for several months or it may be canned as follows:

Hot Pack-Bring kraut and liquid slowly to a boil in a large pot, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and fill jars rather firmly with kraut and liquid, leaving ½-inch head space. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes for pints; 15 for quarts in a boiling water bath.

Raw Pack-Fill jars firmly with kraut and liquid, leaving ½-inch head space. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process pints for 20 minutes; quarts for 25 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Squash Bread-and-Butter Pickles

Use the "Bread-and-Butter Pickles" recipe, substituting slender (1 to 1 ½ inches in diameter) zucchini or yellow squash for cucumbers.

Pickles Bread-and-Butter Zucchini
(about 8 or 9 pint jars)

 

16 cups fresh zucchini, sliced
4 cups onions, thinly sliced
½ cup salt
4 cups white vinegar
2 cups sugar
4 tablespoons mustard seed
2 tablespoon celery seed
2 teaspoons ground turmeric

 

Cover zucchini and onion slices with 1 inch of water and salt. Let stand 2 hours and drain thoroughly. Combine vinegar, sugar and spices. Bring to a boil. Add zucchini and onions. Simmer 5 minutes. Fill jars with mixture, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jars to ½ inch from top with hot pickling solution. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process pints or quarts for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Squash Pickles-I
(2 pint jars)

 

2 pounds fresh firm zucchini or yellow summer squash
2 small onions
¼ cup salt
2 cups white sugar
1 teaspoon celery salt
1 teaspoon celery salt
1 teaspoon turmeric
2 teaspoons mustard seed
3 cups cider vinegar

 

Wash squash and cut in thin slices. Peel and slice onions thinly. Place vegetables in a large bowl and sprinkle with salt. Cover with cold water and stir to blend in salt. Let stand 2 hours. Drain thoroughly. Bring remaining ingredients to a boil. Pour over squash and onions. Let stand 2 hours. Bring all ingredients to a boil and heat 5 minutes.

Pack vegetables into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jar ½ inch from top with boiling liquid. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Squash Pickles-II
(about 5 pint jars)

 

4 pound summer squash
¼ cup salt
1 quart vinegar
Dill seed (1 teaspoon per pint)
Garlic, if desired (1 clove per pint)

 

Wash and slice squash. Pack garlic, dill seed, and squash into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Bring vinegar, water, and salt to a boil; simmer 5 minutes. Fill jars ½ inch from top with boiling hot liquid. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Fruit Pickle Recipes

Spiced Apple Rings
(about 8 or 9 pint jars)

 

12 pounds firm tart apples
(maximum diameter, 2 ½ inches)
12 cups sugar
6 cups water
1¼ cups white vinegar
3 tablespoons whole cloves
¾ cup red hot cinnamon candies
or 8 cinnamon sticks
and 1 teaspoon red food coloring (optional)

 

Wash apples. To prevent discoloration, peel and core one apple at a time. Immediately cut crosswise into ½-inch rings and immerse in an anti-darkening solution. To make flavored syrup, combine sugar, water, vinegar, cloves, cinnamon candies (or cinnamon sticks and food coloring) in a 6-quart saucepan. Heat to a boil, stirring constantly. Simmer 3 minutes. Remove apples from anti-darkening solution and drain well. Add to hot syrup and cook 5 minutes. Fill half-pint or pint jars (preferably wide-mouth) with apple rings, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jars to ½ inch from top with hot syrup. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Spiced Crabapples
(3 quart jars)

 

2 quarts crabapples with stems
3 cups distilled white vinegar
3 cups water
6 cups sugar
Tie in a spice bag:
1 stick cinnamon (3-inch piece)
1 tablespoon allspice
1 tablespoon whole cloves

 

Choose round crabapples, uniform in size. Wash and drain. Do not peel. To prevent bursting, pierce peel with a large sterilized needle. Mix together vinegar, water, and sugar; add spice bag. Boil until syrup coats spoon. Add crabapples. Reheat slowly to avoid bursting the skins and simmer until apples are tender.

Pack hot apples into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jar ½ inch from top with boiling syrup. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 20 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Fig Pickles
(about 8 pint jars)

 

4 quarts firm-ripe figs
3 cups sugar
2 quarts water
2 cups sugar
2 sticks cinnamon
1 tablespoon whole allspice
1 tablespoon whole cloves
3 cups vinegar

 

Peel figs. (If unpeeled are preferred, pour boiling water over figs and let stand until cool; drain.). Add 3 cups sugar to water and cook until sugar dissolves. Add figs and cook slowly 30 minutes. Add 2 cups sugar and vinegar. Tie spices in a cheesecloth bag.; add to figs.

Cook gently until figs are clear. Cover and let stand 12 to 24 hours in a cool place. Remove spice bag.

Heat to simmering; pack, hot, into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in boiling water bath.

Spiced Red Grapes
(4pint jars)

 

5 pounds red or purple grapes
1 cup distilled white vinegar
4 cups sugar
½ teaspoon each: ground nutmeg, ground ginger,
ground cloves and ground cinnamon

 

Wash, drain and crush grapes. To remove seeds cook pulp and hulls over low heat until pulp is soft. Then press through a colander. Heat the vinegar and spices in a pot. Dissolve the sugar in the liquid and bring to a boil. Cook 5 minutes. Add the grapes and cook slowly until thick.

Pour hot grapes into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Spiced Muscadines
(about 10 pint jars)

 

5 pounds deseeded grapes
10 1/8 cups sugar
1 cup vinegar
1½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
4 teaspoons ground mace

 

Wash, drain and crush grapes. To remove seeds, cook pulp and hulls over low heat until pulp is soft. Then press through a colander. Continue cooking grapes until hulls are tender. Add sugar and cook until thick. Add spices and vinegar. Cook until the product gives a very light gel test (210° F).

Pack hot into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Peach Pickles
(about 6 pint jars)

 

8 pounds peeled peaches (small to medium size)
6 ¾ cups sugar
4 sticks cinnamon ( 2 inches long)
2 tablespoons whole cloves, crushed
1 tablespoon ginger
1 quart vinegar

 

Wash and peel peaches with a sharp knife, and drop into a cold solution of ½ teaspoon ascorbic acid and 2 quarts water.

Dissolve sugar in vinegar in saucepot and put on range to heat. Boil 5 minutes and skim. Add spices (tied loosely in cheesecloth).

Drain peaches. Drop drained peaches into boiling syrup and cook until they can be pierced with a fork, but not soft. Remove from range and allow peaches to set in syrup overnight to plump.

Bring to a boil and pack into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Cover with syrup, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 20 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Pear Pickles
(about 7 or 8 pint jars)

 

2 quarts (8 cups) sugar
1 quart (4 cups) white vinegar
1 pint (2 cups) water
8 cinnamon sticks, 2-inch
2 tablespoons cloves, whole
2 tablespoons, allspice, whole
8 pounds (4 or 5 quarts) Seckel pears
or other pickling pear pieces

 

Combine sugar, vinegar, water and cinnamon; add cloves and allspice that are tied in a clean, thin, white cloth. Bring to a boil and simmer, covered, about 30 minutes.

Wash pears, remove skins, and all of blossom end; the stems may be left on if desired. If pears are large, halve or quarter. To prevent peeled pears from darkening during preparation, immediately put them into cold water containing ½ teaspoon ascorbic acid per 2 quarts. Drain just before using.

Add pears to the boiling syrup and continue simmering for 20 to 25 minutes. Pack hot pears into hot pint jars; add one 2-inch piece cinnamon per jar and cover with boiling syrup to ½ from top of jar. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 20 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Spiced Pears
(about 4 pint jars)

 

3½ pounds medium-ripe pears (14-16)
2½ cups granulated sugar
1¼ cups white vinegar
1 cup water
Tie in a spice bag:
2 teaspoons whole ginger
2 tablespoons whole cloves
7 sticks cinnamon (3-inch pieces)

 

Wash, peel, and core pears. Place immediately in a solution of ½ teaspoon ascorbic acid and 2 quarts of water to prevent browning. combine sugar, vinegar, and 1 cup water; bring to a boil. Add spices tied in cheesecloth bag. Boil 5 minutes. Drain pears and add to syrup. Simmer 5 minutes or until soft but still firm. Remove spice bag.

Pack pears into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jars to ½ inch of top with boiling hot syrup. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Spiced Plums
(4 quart jars)

 

4 quarts plums
6 cups sugar
1 cup distilled white vinegar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground allspice
½ teaspoon ground cloves

 

Wash and drain plums. Prick each plum with a fork to prevent the skins from bursting. Place plums in a large crock. Combine sugar, vinegar, and spices; boil 5 minutes. Pour syrup over plums and let stand 24 hours. Drain syrup, heat and pour over plums again the second day. Let stand 24 hours.

The third day, pack the plums into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jar to½ inch of top with boiling hot syrup. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Watermelon Rind Pickles
(about 4 or 5 pints)

 

3 quarts (about 6 pounds)
watermelon rind, unpared
¾ cup salt
3 quarts water
2 quarts (2 trays) ice cubes
9 cups sugar
3 cups vinegar, white
3 cups water
1 tablespoon (about 48) whole cloves
6 cinnamon sticks, 1-inch-pieces
1 lemon, thinly sliced, with seeds removed

 

Pare rind and all pink edges from the watermelon. Cut into 1-inch squares or fancy shapes as desired. Cover with brine made by mixing the salt with 3 quarts cold water. Add ice cubes. Let stand 3 to 4 hours.

Drain; rinse in cold water. Cover with cold water and cook until fork tender, about 10 minutes (do not overcook). Drain.

Combine sugar, vinegar, water, and spices (tied in a clean, thin, white cloth). Boil 5 minutes and pour over the watermelon; add lemon slices. Let stand overnight.

Heat watermelon in syrup to boiling and cook slowly 1 hour. Pack hot pickles loosely into clean, hot pint jars. To each jar add 1 piece of stick cinnamon from spice bag; cover with boiling syrup to ½ inch from top. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Relish Recipes

Sweet Apple Relish
(4 pint jars)

 

4 pounds apples, peeled,
cored and sliced thin
1¼ cups distilled white vinegar
1 cup sugar
½ cup light corn syrup
2/3 cup water
1½ teaspoons whole cloves
2 sticks cinnamon (3-inch pieces)
1 teaspoon whole allspice

 

Immerse apples in a solution of ½ teaspoon ascorbic acid and 2 quarts of water to prevent browning. Combine sugar, corn syrup, 1¼ cups white vinegar, water, cloves, cinnamon and allspice; bring to a boil. Drain apples and add to syrup. Simmer 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Pack fruit into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jars ½ inch from top with boiling hot syrup. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Jerusalem Artichoke Relish
(about 10 half-pint jars)

 

2 pounds Jerusalem artichokes
1 cup salt
1 gallon water
1 pint ground sweet red
or green peppers
1 pint ground onions
2 tablespoons mustard seed
1 tablespoon turmeric
¼ teaspoon salt
2 ¼ cups sugar
1 quart vinegar

 

Wash artichokes well and trim as needed. Soak overnight in brine of 1 cup salt to 1 gallon water. Next morning drain well.

Using coarse blade, grind artichokes, onions and peppers. Mix in mustard seed, ¼ teaspoon salt and turmeric. Dissolve sugar in vinegar and bring to boil. Combine mixtures. Bring to rolling boil. Pack hot into hot half-pint jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Corn Relish
(about 9 pint jars)

 

10 cups whole kernel corn.
Use fresh (16 to 20 medium-sized ears)
or frozen (whole kernel, six 10-ounce packages)
2½ cups sweet red pepper, diced
2½ cups green pepper, diced
2½ cups chopped celery
1¼ cups chopped onions
1¾ cups sugar
5 cups vinegar
2½ tablespoons salt
2½ teaspoons celery seed
2½ tablespoons dry mustard
1¼ teaspoon turmeric

 

Fresh corn-Remove husks and silks. Cook ears of corn in boiling water for 5 minutes; remove and plunge into cold water. Drain; cut corn from cob. Do not scrape cob.

Frozen corn-Defrost in refrigerator overnight or in a microwave oven.

To Make Relish-Combine peppers, celery, onions, sugar, vinegar, salt and celery seed. Cover pan until mixture starts to boil, then boil uncovered for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Mix dry mustard and turmeric and blend with a small amount of liquid from boiling mixture. Add with corn, to boiling mixture. Return to boiling and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

This relish may be thickened when the corn is added, by adding ¼ cup flour blended with ¼ cup water. Frequent stirring will be necessary to prevent sticking and scorching.

Pack loosely while boiling hot into hot pint jars, filling to ½ inch from top. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Chow-Chow
(about 4 pint jars)

 

1 pint of each of the following:
sliced cucumbers
chopped sweet peppers
chopped cabbage
sliced onions
chopped green tomatoes
lima beans
cut green beans
sliced carrots
1½ cups salt
2 quarts water
2 tablespoons celery seed
4 tablespoons mustard seed
1 quart distilled vinegar
2 cups water
4 cups sugar
4 teaspoons turmeric

 

Soak cucumbers, peppers, cabbage, onions and tomatoes in salt water overnight (1½ cups salt to 2 quarts water). Cook lima beans, green beans and carrots until tender. Drain. Mix soaked and cooked vegetables with remaining ingredients and boil 10 minutes.

Pack hot into hot pint jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Dixie Relish
(5 pint jars)

 

2 cups chopped sweet red peppers
(about 4 medium)
2 cups chopped sweet green peppers
(about 4 medium)
1 quart chopped cabbage
(about 1 small head)
2 cups chopped onions
¼ cup salt
2 quarts cold water
¾ cup sugar
2 tablespoons mustard seed
2 tablespoons celery seed
1 quart vinegar

 

Dissolve salt in 2 quarts cold water. Pour over chopped vegetables and let stand 1 hour. Drain. Combine sugar, vinegar and spices; add vegetables and simmer 20 minutes. Bring to boiling.

Pack boiling hot into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Fall Garden Relish
(about 4 pint jars)

 

1 quart chopped cabbage
(about 1 small head)
3 cups chopped cauliflower
(about 1 medium head)
2 cups chopped green tomatoes
(about 4 medium)
2 cups chopped onions
2 cups chopped sweet green peppers
(about 4 medium)
1 cup chopped sweet red peppers
(about 2 medium)
3¾ cups vinegar
4½ tablespoons salt
2¾ cups sugar
3 teaspoons celery seed
3 teaspoons dry mustard
1½ teaspoons turmeric

 

Combine chopped vegetables; sprinkle with the 3 tablespoons salt. Let stand 4 to 6 hours in a cool place. Drain well. Combine vinegar, sugar and spices; simmer 10 minutes. Add vegetables; simmer 10 minutes. Bring to a boil.

Pack boiling hot relish into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Pickled Green Tomato Relish
(about 8 pint jars)

 

10 pounds small, hard green tomatoes
1 ½ pounds red bell peppers
1½ pounds green bell peppers
2 pounds onions
½ cup canning salt
1 quart water
4 cups sugar
1 quart vinegar
1/3 cup prepared mustard
2 tablespoons cornstarch

 

Sterilize canning jars. Wash and coarsely grate or finely chop tomatoes, peppers and onions. Dissolve salt in water and pour over vegetables in large saucepot. Heat to boiling and simmer 5 minutes. Drain vegetables and return to saucepot. Add sugar, vinegar, mustard and cornstarch. Stir to mix. Heat to boiling and simmer 5 minutes. Fill hot pint jars with hot relish, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 5 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Horseradish Relish
(about 2 half pints)

 

2 cups (¾ pound) freshly
grated horseradish
1 cup white vinegar
½ teaspoon canning salt
¼ teaspoon powdered ascorbic acid

 

Sterilize canning jars. Wash horseradish roots thoroughly and peel off brown outer skin. The peeled roots may be grated in a food processor or cut into small cubes and put through a food grinder. Combine ingredients and fill into hot jars, leaving ¼-inch head space. Seal jars tightly and store in a refrigerator.

NOTE: The pungency of fresh horseradish fades within 1 to 2 months, even when refrigerated. Therefore, make only small quantities at a time.

Onion Relish
(2 to 3 pint jars)

 

8 cups peeled, sliced onions
(about 3 pounds)
1 cup white vinegar
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon mustard seed

 

Drop onions in boiling water and cook 4 minutes. Drain. Combine vinegar, sugar, salt and mustard seed in a large saucepan. Bring mixture to a boil. Add onions and simmer 4 minutes.

Pack onions into hot jars, leaving ½-inch space. Fill jar ½ inch from top with boiling hot cooking liquid (be sure onions are totally immersed in vinegar solution). Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Vidalia Onion Relish
(about 8 pint jars)

 

1½ gallons ground Vidalia onions
(about 20 lbs)
½ cup salt
1 quart apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon tumeric
4 teaspoons pickling spice
4 tablespoons pimento, chopped
4½ cups sugar

 

Grind enough Vidalia onions to yield 1½ gallons, add ½ cup salt and let stand 30 minutes. Squeeze juice from onion-salt mixture and discard juice. Tie pickling spice in cheesecloth. Combine onions, vinegar, sugar, tumeric, spice bag, and pimento in a large saucepot. Bring to a boil and cook until thick, (approximately 30 minutes), stirring often. Remove and discard spice bag.

Pack both onions and cooking liquid to cover in hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Oscar Relish
(6 pint jars)

 

8 cups chopped fresh peaches
(about 12 large)
8 cups chopped ripe tomatoes
(about 12)
2 cups diced green sweet peppers
(2 large)
1 tablespoon red hot pepper, ground
(1 pepper)
2 cups ground onions
(about 6)
4 cups light brown sugar
(firmly packed)
2 cups cider vinegar
½ tablespoon salt
½ box (4 tablespoons) pickling spices,
tied in cheesecloth bag

 

Peel and pit peaches. Chop into small pieces. Peel and chop tomatoes into ½-inch pieces. Remove stem and seed from peppers and dice into ¼-inch pieces. Peel onions and grind in food chopper. Grind red hot peppers.

Combine all ingredients in 10-quart saucepan. Cook and stir about 1½ to 2 hours, until it reaches desired thickness.

Pack in hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Variation - Use two small hot peppers if you like a hotter relish. For milder relish, substitute Tobasco to taste (½ to 1 teaspoon), for the peppers.

Pear Relish
(about 10 pint jars)

 

1 peck pears
6 large onions
6 sweet green peppers
6 sweet red peppers
1 bunch celery
3 cups sugar
1 tablespoon allspice
1 tablespoon salt
5 cups vinegar

 

Wash the pears, onions, peppers and celery in cold water. Peel and core the pears. Remove stems and seeds from the peppers. Clean the celery, peel the onions, and put them through a food chopper. Then add the sugar, allspice, salt and vinegar and let stand overnight. Heat to boiling.

Pack hot, into hot pint jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 20 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Pepper Relish
(about 4 or pint jars)

2 dozen bell peppers, red and green
7 medium onions
2 tablespoons mustard seed
2 tablespoons salt
3 cups vinegar
3 cups sugar

 

Grind peppers and onions, saving the juice. Combine all ingredients. Boil 30 minutes.

Pack into hot jars to ½ inch from top. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Piccalilli
(3 pint jars)

 

6 cups chopped green tomatoes
1½ cups chopped sweet red peppers
1½ cups chopped green peppers
7½ cups chopped cabbage
2¼ cups chopped onions
½ cup canning salt
4½ cups vinegar
3 cups brown sugar, packed
3 tablespoons whole mixed pickling spice

 

Combine vegetables. Mix with salt, let stand overnight. Drain and press in a clean, thin, white cloth to remove all liquid possible.

Combine vinegar and sugar. Place spices loosely in a clean cloth; tie with a string. Add to vinegar mixture. Bring to a boil.

Add vegetables, return to a boil, and boil gently about 30 minutes, or until mixture is reduced one-half in volume. Remove spice bag. Sterilize canning jars.

Pack hot relish into hot pint jars. Fill jars to ½ inch from top. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 5 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Pickle Relish
(about 9 pint jars)

 

3 quarts chopped cucumbers
3 cups each of chopped sweet
green and red peppers
1 cup chopped onions
¾ cup canning salt
4 cups ice
8 cups water
2 cups sugar
4 teaspoons each of mustard seed,
tumeric, whole allspice and whole cloves
6 cups white vinegar

 

Place cucumbers, peppers, onions, salt, ice and water in a large container. Let stand 4 hours. Drain and re-cover vegetables with fresh ice water for another hour. Drain again. Combine spices in a cheesecloth bag. Add spices to sugar and vinegar in a saucepan. Heat to boiling and pour mixture over vegetables. Cover and refrigerate 24 hours. Heat mixture to boiling and pour into hot half-pint jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Sweet Pickle Relish
(about 7 half-pint jars)

 

4 cups chopped cucumbers
(about 4 medium)
2 cups chopped onions
1 chopped green pepper
1 chopped sweet red pepper
¼ cup salt
3½ cups sugar
2 cups cider vinegar
1 tablespoon celery seed
1 tablespoon mustard seed

 

Combine cucumbers, onions, green peppers and red peppers in a large bowl; sprinkle with salt and cover with cold water. Let stand 2 hours.

Drain thoroughly; press out excess liquid. Combine sugar, vinegar and spices; heat to boiling. Add drained vegetables and simmer 10 minutes.

Pack hot into hot half-pint jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in boiling water bath.

Rummage Relish
(about 8 pint jars)

 

2 quarts cored, chopped green tomatoes
(about 16 medium)
1 quart peeled, cored, chopped red ripe tomatoes
(about 6 large)
1 quart chopped cabbage
(about 1 small head)
2 cups chopped celery
1 cup chopped sweet green peppers
(about 2 medium)
1 cup chopped cucumbers
1 cup chopped sweet red peppers
(about 2 medium)
½ cup salt
4 cups brown sugar
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon celery seed
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon mustard seed
1 teaspoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon ground cloves
2 quarts vinegar

 

Combine vegetables; add salt and mix thoroughly. Let stand 12 to 18 hours in a cool place; drain thoroughly. Add sugar, spices and garlic to vinegar; simmer 10 minutes. Add vegetables; simmer 30 minutes. Bring to a boil.

Pack hot relish into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Curry Relish
(about 8 pint jars)

 

Follow recipe for RUMAGE RELISH and add 2 cups raisins and 1½ teaspoons curry powder when vegetables are added to pickling solution.

Chutney Recipes

Apple Chutney
(about 6 pint jars)

 

2 quarts chopped, core, pared tart apples
(about 10 medium)
1 cup chopped onions
1 cup chopped sweet red bell peppers
(about 2 medium)
2 hot red peppers, seeded and chopped
1½ pounds seedless raisins
4 cups brown sugar
3 tablespoons mustard seed
2 tablespoons ground ginger
2 tablespoons ground allspice
2 teaspoons salt
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 quart vinegar

 

Combine all ingredients; simmer until thick, about 1 hour and 15 minutes. As mixture thickens stir frequently to prevent sticking.

Pour boiling hot chutney into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Peach Chutney
(about 4 to 6 pint jars)

 

1 medium onion
1 small clove garlic
2 tablespoons mustard seed
3 quarts peaches, diced
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 cup seedless raisins
1 cup crystallized ginger, chopped
1 teaspoon salt
1 quart vinegar
2¼ cups brown sugar

 

Put onion, garlic and raisins through food chopped using fine blade. Peel, dice and measure peaches. Mix peaches with remaining ingredients. Add the onion, garlic, and raisin mixture. Mix well. Simmer an hour, or until deep brown and thick.

Pack into hot canning jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in boiling water bath.

Tomato-Apple Chutney
(about 7 or 8 pint jars)

 

About 6 pounds tomatoes
3 quarts apples, pared, chopped
(about 5 pounds)
2 cups seedless white raisins
2 cups chopped onion
1 cup chopped green pepper
2 pounds brown sugar
1 quart vinegar, white
4 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon ground ginger
¼ cup whole mixed pickling spice

 

Remove skins from tomatoes. Chop tomatoes to make 3 quarts.

Combine all ingredients except the whole spices. Place spices loosely in a clean, white cloth; tie with a string, and add to tomato-apple mixture. Bring to a boil; boil gently, stirring frequently, until mixture is thickened and reduced about one-half in volume (about 1 hour). Remove spice bag.

Pack the boiling hot chutney into hot pint jars to ½ inch from the top of the jar. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Miscellaneous Pickled Product Recipes

Pepper Sauce (Jalapeno, Hungarian or Banana)

 

Wash and drain small hot peppers. Be sure to wear gloves when working with peppers to prevent burns. Cut off stems to within 1/8 inch of the pepper. Make two or three slits in each. Pack tightly into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jar to within ½ inch of top with boiling hot cider vinegar. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process half-pints for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

 

Pickled Pigs Feet

 

Pigs feet
2 quarts vinegar
1 small red pepper
2 tablespoons grated horseradish
1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
1 teaspoon whole allspice
1 bay leaf

 

Scald, scrape, and clean feet thoroughly. Sprinkle lightly with salt and let stand for 4 to 8 hours in the refrigerator. Wash the feet well in clean water. Place them in hot water and cook until tender but not until meat can be removed from bones.

Mix remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil.

Pack feet into hot jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jars ½ inch from top with the boiling vinegar solution. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids and process.

Process in a Dial Gauge Pressure Canner at 11 pounds pressure or in a Weighted Gauge Pressure Canner at 10 pounds pressure:

 

Pints or Quarts .................................. 75 minutes
CAUTION: If you are processing at an altitude over 1000 feet, follow the altitude adjustments given for canning vegetables.

Pickled Eggs

 

16 fresh eggs
2 tablespoons whole allspice
2 tablespoons whole peppercorns
2 tablespoons ground ginger
4 cups white vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar

 

Cook eggs in simmering water for 15 minutes. Place eggs in cold water, remove shells, and pack into sterilized jars. In a pot combine vinegar, sugar, and spices. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer 5 minutes. Pour hot liquid over hard-cooked eggs. Seal. Store in refrigerator (use within a month - not for long term storage).

 

Reduced Sodium Pickle Recipes

Reduced-Sodium Sliced Dill Pickles

 

4 pounds cucumbers (3- to 5-inch)
6 cups vinegar
6 cups sugar
2 tablespoons canning salt
1½ teaspoons celery seed
1½ teaspoons mustard seed
2 large onions, thinly sliced
8 heads fresh dill

 

Wash cucumbers. Cut 1/16-inch slice off blossom end and discard. Cut cucumbers in ¼-inch slices. Combine vinegar, sugar, salt, celery and mustard seeds in large saucepan. Bring mixture to a boil. Place 2 slices of onions and ½ dill head in each pint jar. Fill jars with cucumber slices, leaving ½-inch head space. Add 1 slice of onion and ½ head dill on top. Pour hot pickling solution over cucumbers, leaving ¼-inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.

 

Reduced-Sodium Sliced Sweet Pickles
(about 4 or 5 pint jars)

 

4 pounds (3- to 4-inch) cucumbers

Brining solution:
1 quart distilled white vinegar
1 tablespoon canning salt
1 tablespoon mustard seed
½ cup sugar

Canning syrup:
1 2/3 cups distilled white vinegar
3 cups sugar
1 tablespoon whole allspice
2¼ teaspoons celery seed

 

Wash cucumbers and cut 1/16-inch off blossom end and discard. Cut cucumbers into ¼-inch slices. In a large saucepot, mix the ingredients for the brining solution. Add the cut cucumbers, cover and simmer until the cucumbers change color from bright to dull green (about 5 to 7 minutes). At the same time, mix canning syrup ingredients in a saucepan. Bring syrup to a boil. Drain the cucumber slices. Pack cucumbers in jars, leaving ½-inch head space. Fill jars to ½ inch from top with hot canning syrup. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

 

Boiling Water Bath Processing Times for Cucumber Pickles at Altitudes Over 1000 Feet

 

Process time (Minutes)
at Altitudes of
Product Style of
Pack
Jar Size 1001-3000 feet 3001-6000 feet over 6000 feet
Fermented
Dill Pickles
Raw Pints
Quarts
15
20
15
20/td>
20
25
Quick Fresh
Pack Dill
Pickles
Raw Pints
Quarts
15
20
15
20
20
25
Kosher Dills Raw Pints 15 15 20
Bread-and-
Butter Pickles
Hot Pints or Quarts 15 15 20
Quick Sour
Pickles
Raw Pints 15 15 20
Ice Water
Pickles
Raw Quarts 15 15 20
Sweet Cucumber
Pickles
Raw Pints or Quarts 15 15 20
Sweet
Gherkins
Raw Pints 10 10 15
Sweet
Pickle Rings
Hot Pints 15 15 20
Quick Sweet
Pickle Slices
or Strips
Raw
Hot
Pints or Quarts
Pints
Quarts
10
15
20
10
15
20
15
20
25
14-Day Sweet
Pickles
Raw Pints
Quarts
10
15
10
15
15
20

 

Boiling Water Bath Processing Times for Vegetable Pickles at Altitudes Over 1000 Feet

Process time (Minutes)
at Altitudes of
Product Style of
Pack
Jar Size 1001-3000 feet 3001-6000 feet over 6000 feet
Artichoke
Pickles
Raw Pint 15 15 20
Pickled
Green Beans
Raw Pint 10 10 15
Pickled
Three-Bean
Salad
Hot Half-Pints
or Pints
20 20 25
Pickled
Beets
Hot Pints or Quarts 35 40 45
Kosher-Style
Dill Green
Tomato
Pickles
Raw Quarts 20 20 25
Spiced Green
Tomato Pickles
Hot Pints 20 20 25
Mixed
Vegetable Pickles
Hot Pints 20 20 25
Marinated
Whole Mushrooms
Hot Half-Pints 25 30 35
Okra Dill Pickles Hot Pints 15 15 20
Pickled Onions Raw Pints 15 15 20
Marinated
Peppers
Raw Half-Pints
Pints
20
25
20
30
25
35
Pickled
Peppers
Raw Pints 15 15 20
Pickled
Jalapeno
Peppers
Raw Pints 15 15 20
Sauerkraut Hot

Raw

Pints
Quarts
Pints
Quarts
15
20
25
30
15
20
30
35
20
25
35
40
Squash Bread-
and-Butter
Pickles
Hot Pints or Quarts 15 15 20
Pickled Bread-
and-Butter
Zucchini
Hot Pints or Quarts 15 15 20
Squash
Pickles - I
Hot Pints 20 20 25
Squash
Pickles - II
Raw Pints 20 20 25

 

Boiling Water Bath Processing Times for Relishes at Altitudes Over 1000 Feet

 

Process time (Minutes)
at Altitudes of
Product Style of
Pack
Jar Size 1001-3000 feet 3001-6000 feet over 6000 feet
Sweet Apple
Relish
Hot Pints 15 15 20
Jerusalem
Artichoke
Relish
Hot Half-Pints 15 15 20
Corn Relish Hot Pints 20 20 25
Chow-Chow Hot Pints 15 15 20
Dixie Relish Hot Pints 20 20 25
Fall Garden
Relish
Hot Pints 15 15 20
Pickled Green
Tomato Relish
Hot Pints 10 10 15
Onion Relish Hot Pints 15 15 20
Vidalia Onion
Relish
Hot Pints 15 15 20
Oscar Relish Hot Pints 15 15 20
Pear Relish Hot Pints 25 30 35
Pepper Relish Hot Pints 15 15 20
Piccalilli Hot Pints 10 10 15
Pickle Relish Hot Pints 15 15 20
Sweet Pickle
Relish
Hot Half-Pints 15 15 20
Rummage Relish Hot Pints 20 20 25
Curry Relish Hot Pints 20 20 25

 

Boiling Water Bath Processing Times for Chutneys, Pepper Sauce and Reduced-Sodium Pickles at Altitudes Over 1000 Feet

 

Process time (Minutes)
at Altitudes of
Product Style of
Pack
Jar Size 1001-3000 feet 3001-6000 feet over 6000 feet
Apple Chutney Hot Pints 15 15 20
Peach Chutney Hot Pints 15 15 20
Tomato-Apple
Chutney
Hot Pints 15 15 20
Pepper Sauce Hot Half-Pints
or Pints
15 15 20
Reduced-Sodium
Sliced Dill
Pickles
Hot Pints 20 20 25
Reduced-Sodium
Sliced Sweet
Pickles
Hot Pints 15 15 20

 

 

Boiling Water Bath Processing Times for Fruit Pickles at Altitudes Over 1000 Feet

 

Process time (Minutes)
at Altitudes of
Product Style of
Pack
Jar Size 1001-3000 feet 3001-6000 feet over 6000 feet
Spiced Apple
Rings
Hot Half-Pints 15 15 20
Spiced
Crabapples
Hot Pints 25 30 35
Fig Pickles Hot Pints 20 20 30
Spiced Red
Grapes
Hot Pints 15 15 20
Spiced
Muscadines
Hot Pints 15 15 20
Peach Pickles Hot Pints 25 30 35
Pear Pickles Hot Pints 25 30 35
Spiced Pears Hot Pints 20 20 25
Spiced Plums Raw Pints 15 15 20
Watermelon
Rind Pickles
Raw Pints 15 15 20

 

Most Frequently Asked Pickle Questions

  1. Can I use flaked salt for pickling?

    Most recipes call for granulating pickling or canning salt. Flake salt varies in density and is not recommended for pickling.

  2. When making quick process pickles, can I store any leftover pickling solution for future use?

    If the pickling solution is fresh and has not been used to make pickles, cover it and store it in the refrigerator for later use. If the pickling solution has been used, it can be stored in the refrigerator and reused in 1 or 2 days for barbecue sauce, cole slaw dressing or a marinade. If mold growth occurs, throw it out.

  3. Why did the liquid in my dill pickles turn pink?

    Using overmature dill may cause this. If so, the product is still safe. However, yeast growth could also cause this. If yeast growth is evident, discard the pickles.

  4. I don't have the type of dill my recipe calls for. How can I substitute what I have.

    For each quart try 3 heads of fresh dill or 1 to 2 tablespoons dill seed (dill weed = 2T).

  5. Can I use burpless cucumbers for pickling?

    Burpless cucumbers are not recommended for use in fermented pickles. This is because at their normal mature size, they produce a softening enzyme that causes the pickles to soften during fermentation. However, if smaller burpless cucumbers (those with small seeds) are used, they may be suitable for making fresh pack pickles. The skins on burpless cucumbers may be tough.

  6. I have an old recipe that calls for adding a grape leaf to each jar of pickles. Why?

    Grape leaves contain a substitute that inhibits the enzymes that make pickles soft. However, if you remove the blossom ends (the source of undesirable enzymes) you don't need to add grape leaves.

  7. Why did the garlic cloves in my pickles turn green or bluish green?

    This reaction may be due to iron, tin or aluminum in your cooking pot, water or water pipes reacting with the pigments in the garlic. Or, the garlic may naturally have more bluish pigment and it is more evident after pickling. Immature bulbs should be cured 2 - 4 weeks at 70° F. The pickles are safe to eat.

 

Remedies for Pickling Problems

Problem Cause Prevention

Soft or slippery pickles (if spoilage is evident - do not eat) 1. A brine too weak. 1. Maintain salt concentration specified in recipe.
2. Vinegar too weak. 2. Use vinegar at 5% acidity.
3. Cucumbers stored at too high a temperature during curing/blending. 3. Store cucumbers between 70° and 75° F. This is the optimum temperature for growth of the organisms necessary for fermentation.
4. Insufficient amount of brine. 4. Keep cucumbers immersed in the brine.
5. Pickles not processed properly (to destroy microorganisms). 5. See section on processing pickles
6. Moldy garlic or spices. 6. Always use fresh spices.
7. Blossom ends not removed. 7. Always remove blossom ends.

Strong, bitter taste 1. Spices cooked too long in vinegar, or too many spices used. 1. Follow directions for amount of spices to use and the boiling time.
2. Vinegar too strong. 2. Use vinegar of the proper strength (5% acidity).
3. Dry weather. 3. No prevention. Bitter taste is usually in the peeling.
4. Using salt substitutes. 4. Potassium chloride, the ingredient in these, is naturally bitter.

Hollow Pickles 1. Cucumbers too large for brining. 1. Use smaller cucumbers for brining.
2. Improper cutting. 2. Keep brine proper strength and the product well covered. Cure until fermentation is complete.
3. Long lapse of time between gathering and brining. 3. Pickling process should be started within 24 hours after gathering.
4. Faulty growth of cucumber. 4. None. During washing, hollow cucumbers usually float. Remove and use for relishes.

Shriveled Pickles 1. Placing cucumbers in too strong brine, too heavy syrup, or too strong vinegar. 1. Follow a reliable recipe. Use amounts of salt and sugar called for in a recipe, and vinegar that is 5% acidity.
2. Long lapse of time between gathering and brining. 2. Brine within 24 hours after gathering.
3. Over-cooking or over processing. 3. Follow a reliable recipe exactly.
4. Dry weather. 4. No prevention.

Scum on the brine surfaces while curing cucumbers. 1. Wild yeasts, and bacteria that feed on the acid thus reducing the concentration if allowed to accumulate. 1. Remove scum as often as needed.

Dark or discolored pickles (if brass, copper or zinc utensils were used - do not use pickles) 1. Minerals in hard water. 1. Use soft water.
2. Ground spices used. 2. Use whole spices.
3. Spices left in pickles. 3. Place spices loosely in cheesecloth bag so they can be removed before canning.
4. Brass, iron, copper or zinc utensils used. 4. Use unchipped enamelware, glass, stainless steel, or stoneware utensils.
5. Iodized salt used. 5. Use canning or pickling salt.

Spotted, dull, or faded color 1. Cucumbers not well cured (brined). 1. Use brine of proper concentration. Complete fermentation process.
2. Excessive exposure to light. 2. Store in a dark, dry cool place.
3. Cucumber of poor quality. 3. Work with good quality produce.

White sediment in crock or jar. 1. Bacteria cause this during fermentation. 1. None.
2. Salt contains an anti-caking agent. 2. Use canning or pickling salt.

References

  1. Complete Guide to Home Canning, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1988.
  2. Making Pickles and Relishes at Home, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1978.
  3. Making Fermented Pickles and Sauerkraut, I. Wolf, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1976.
  4. Making Fresh Pack Pickle Products I. Wolf, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1976.
  5. Making Pickles at Home, P. Kendall, Cooperative Extension Service, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, 1982.
  6. Making Pickles and Relishes at Home - Ingredients, Equipment and Procedures, M. Phillips, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, Arkansas, 1982.
  7. Making Pickles in North Carolina, N. Tope, Cooperative Extension Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, 1981.
  8. Pickle Oddities, M. Phillips and F. Johnson, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, Arkansas, 1980.